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3085 Woodman Drive, Ste 100
Kettering, OH 45420

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Beavercreek logo in color 2

3121 Evelyn Drive, Suite 110B
Beavercreek, OH 45434

visionmakers logo 2

3085 Woodman Drive, Suite 100
in Kettering

Beavercreek logo in color 2

3121 Evelyn Drive, Suite 110B
in Beavercreek

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Ultraviolet Protection Awareness

sunglasses on beach

You probably know that too much exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays can cause sunburn and skin cancer. But did you know UV also can harm your eyes?

Extended exposure to the sun’s UV rays has been linked to significant eye problems, including cataracts, macular degeneration, pteryguim, skin cancer and corneal sunburn. Over time, the effects of UV rays can cause damage to your eyes. There are three types of UV rays: UV-A, UV-B and UV-C.

UV-A

Can hurt your central vision. It can damage the macula, a part of the retina at the back of your eye.

UV-B

The front part of your eye (the cornea and the lens) absorbs most UV-B rays, but these rays may cause even more damage to your eyes than UV-A rays.

UV-C

These are the highest energy UV rays and potentially could be the most harmful to your eyes and skin. Fortunately, the atmosphere’s ozone layer blocks virtually all UVC rays

What eye problems can UV rays cause:

Macular Degeneration

UV rays may lead to macular degeneration, a leading cause of vision loss for older Americans.

Cataract

UV rays, especially UV-B rays, may also cause some kinds of cataracts. A cataract is a clouding of the eye’s natural lens, the part of the eye that focuses the light we see.

Pterygium

Another UV-related problem is a growth called pterygium. This growth begins on the white of the eye and may involve the cornea. Eventually, the growth may block vision. It is more common in people who work outside in the sun and wind.

Skin Cancer

Skin cancer around the eyelids is also linked to prolonged UV exposure.

Corneal Sunburn

Corneal sunburn, called photokeratitis, is the result of high short-term exposure to UV-B rays. Long hours at the beach or skiing without proper eye protection can cause this problem. It can be very painful and may cause temporary vision loss

ladies in singlasses

Protecting your eyes from UV

To protect your eyes from harmful solar radiation, you should wear sunglasses that block 100 percent UV whenever you are outdoors in daylight. Your eyes need protection even on cloudy days because the sun’s damaging UV rays can penetrate cloud cover.

The month of July is National UV Safety Awareness month.

 

Reference: https://www.allaboutvision.com/sunglasses/spf.htm

Blue Light and how it impacts your eyes, both good and bad

Visible light is much more complex than you might think.

Stepping outdoors into sunlight; flipping on a wall switch indoors; turning on your computer, phone or other digital device — all of these things result in your eyes being exposed to a variety of visible (and sometimes invisible) light rays that can have a range of effects.

What Is Blue Light?

Sunlight contains red, orange, yellow, green and blue light rays and many shades of each of these colors, depending on the energy and wavelength of the individual rays (also called electromagnetic radiation). Combined, this spectrum of colored light rays creates what we call “white light” or sunlight.

spectrum

Key Points About Blue Light

Like ultraviolet radiation, visible blue light — the portion of the visible light spectrum with the shortest wavelengths and highest energy — has both benefits and dangers. Here are important things you should know about blue light:

Blue light is everywhere.

Sunlight is the main source of blue light, and being outdoors during daylight is where most of us get most of our exposure to it. But there are also many man-made, indoor sources of blue light, including fluorescent and LED lighting and flat-screen televisions.

Most notably, the display screens of computers, electronic notebooks, smart phones and other digital devices emit significant amounts of blue light. The amount of HEV light these devices emit is only a fraction of that emitted by the sun. But the amount of time people spend using these devices and the proximity of these screens to the user’s face have many eye doctors and other health care professionals concerned about possible long-term effects of blue light on eye health.

The eye is not very good at blocking blue light.

Anterior structures of the adult human eye (the cornea and lens) are very effective at blocking UV rays from reaching the light-sensitive retina at the back of the eyeball. In fact, less than one percent of UV radiation from the sun reaches the retina, even if you aren’t wearing sunglasses.

Blue light exposure may increase the risk of macular degeneration.

The fact that blue light penetrates all the way to the retina (the inner lining of the back of the eye) is important, because laboratory studies have shown that too much exposure to blue light can damage light-sensitive cells in the retina. This causes changes that resemble those of macular degeneration, which can lead to permanent vision loss

Although more research is needed to determine how much natural and man-made blue light is “too much blue light” for the retina, many eye care providers are concerned that the added blue light exposure from computer screens, smart phones and other digital devices might increase a person’s risk of macular degeneration later in life.

Blue light contributes to digital eye strain.

Because short-wavelength, high energy blue light scatters more easily than other visible light, it is not as easily focused. When you’re looking at computer screens and other digital devices that emit significant amounts of blue light, this unfocused visual “noise” reduces contrast and can contribute to digital eye strain.

Research has shown that lenses that block blue light with wavelengths less than 450 nm (blue-violet light) increase contrast significantly.

Therefore, computer glasses with yellow-tinted lenses may increase comfort when you’re viewing digital devices for extended periods of time.

Blue light protection may be even more important after cataract surgery.

The lens in the adult human eye blocks nearly 100 percent of the sun’s UV rays. As part of the normal aging process, the eye’s natural lens eventually blocks some short-wavelength blue light as well — the type of blue light most likely to cause damage to the retina and lead to macular degeneration and vision loss.

If you have cataracts and are about to have cataract surgery, ask your surgeon what type of intraocular lens (IOL) will be used to replace your cloudy natural lens, and how much blue light protection the IOL provides. After cataract surgery you might benefit from eyeglasses that have lenses with a special blue light filter — especially if you spend long hours in front of a computer screen or using other digital devices.

Not all blue light is bad.

So, is all blue light bad for you? Why not block all blue light, all the time?

Bad idea. It’s well documented that some blue light exposure is essential for good health. Research has shown that high-energy visible light boosts alertness, helps memory and cognitive function and elevates mood.

In fact, something called light therapy is used to treat seasonal affective disorder (SAD) — a type of depression that’s related to changes in seasons, with symptoms usually beginning in the fall and continuing through winter. The light sources for this therapy emit bright white light that contains a significant amount of HEV blue light rays.

Also, blue light is very important in regulating circadian rhythm — the body’s natural wakefulness and sleep cycle. Exposure to blue light during daytime hours helps maintain a healthful circadian rhythm. But too much blue light late at night (reading a novel on a tablet computer or e-reader at bedtime, for example) can disrupt this cycle, potentially causing sleepless nights and daytime fatigue.

Blue Light Filters And Protective Eyewear

If you are using your phone constantly — especially if you use it primarily for texting, e-mailing and web browsing — a convenient way to reduce your blue light exposure is to use a blue light filter.

man and phone

Digital electronic devices emit blue light that can cause eye strain and may lead to eye problems over time.

These filters are available for smart phones, tablets, and computer screens and prevent significant amounts of blue light emitted from these devices from reaching your eyes without affecting the visibility of the display. Some are made with thin tempered glass that also protects your device’s screen from scratches.

As mentioned above, computer glasses also can be helpful to reduce blue light exposure from computers and other digital devices. These special-purpose glasses are available without an eyeglass prescription if you have no need for vision correction or if you routinely wear contact lenses to correct your eyesight. Or they can be specially prescribed to optimize your vision specifically for the distance from which you view your devices.

If you have presbyopia and routinely wear progressive lenses or bifocals, prescription computer glasses with single vision lenses give you the additional benefit of a much larger field of view for seeing your entire computer screen clearly.

Speak with one of our eye doctors or an optician about which type of vision correction and lens features best suit your needs for viewing your computer and other digital devices and protecting your eyes from blue light.

Source: https://www.allaboutvision.com/cvs/blue-light.htm

Take this quiz to see if you might have eye allergies.

Take this quiz to see if you might have eye allergies. Always consult your doctor if you suspect you have an eye condition needing care.

Untitled

 

  • Do allergies run in your family?
  • Do your eyes often itch, particularly during spring pollen season?
  • Have you ever been diagnosed with “pink eye” (conjunctivitis)?
  • Are you allergic to certain animals, such as cats?
  • Do you often need antihistamines and/or decongestants to control sneezing, coughing, and congestion?
  • When pollen is in the air, are your eyes less red and itchy when you stay indoors under an air conditioner?
  • Do your eyes begin tearing when you wear certain cosmetics or lotions, or when you’re around certain strong perfumes?

If you answered “yes” to most of these questions, then you may have eye allergies. Make an appointment with an optometrist to determine the best course of action.

Source: https://www.allaboutvision.com/conditions/allergies.htm

6 easy steps to minimize Computer Vision Syndrome

Many of us find ourselves looking at a computer screen/phone screen multiple hours a day. It could be for our job or you may simply be just shopping on the internet. Whatever the reason, your body is feeling the effects of spending too much time logged on—dry eyes, tired eyes, headaches, neck pain, blurred vision. Luckily, help is on the way!Eyeball

Six Simple Steps to Relief

Here are some simple steps you can take to help minimize the impact of Computer Vision Syndrome: Keep blinking. It washes your eyes in naturally therapeutic tears. Remember 20-20-20. Every 20 minutes, spend 20 seconds looking at something 20 feet away, minimum. Get the right light. Good lighting isn’t just flattering – it’s healthy for your eyes. So, keep bright lighting overhead to a minimum. Keep your desk lamp shining on your desk, not you. Try to keep window light off to the side, rather than in front or behind you. Use blinds and get a glare screen. Position the computer screen to reduce reflections from windows or overhead lights.

Monitor your monitor. Keep it at least 20 inches from your eyes. Center should be about 4 to 6 inches below your eyes. Also, make sure it’s big enough and with just the right brightness and contrast. Adjust the screen so you look at it slightly downward and are about 24 to 28 inches away. Adjust the screen settings to where they are comfortable — contract polarity, resolution, flicker, etc.

Wear those computer glasses. Your eye doctor can prescribe a pair of eyeglasses just for viewing the computer screen well. If necessary, wear the appropriate corrective lenses while at the computer.

Talk to your doc. Have a comprehensive eye exam by one of our doctors. During your eye exam, your eye doctor can check for more than just computer vision problems. He or she will look for signs of health conditions like diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, glaucoma, and macular degeneration. It’s an important part of your overall health routine.

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COVID-19 Update: Patients are required to wear a mask when coming for a pick-up, adjustment or exam. Patients only in the office for exams unless physical assistance is needed.